How we got started on YouTube

We are often asked how we got started on YouTube. The story begins LONG before YouTube even existed. Unfortunately, we didn’t decide to start uploading videos other than piano concerts etc., until 2015. …but let’s rewind…

Tim has always had a passion for home video. Shortly before Katriel was born, he bought a $2,500 “the best you can buy” consumer level Mini-DV camcorder. This device recorded the family fun for many years to come. Video editing was difficult (and expensive) at the time. Tim wasted many hours and $$ trying to make decent videos. Each of these videos would be put on DVD, and mailed to the ‘grandparents’ so that they could see the exploits of their brilliant and beautiful grand-daughter 🙂

In 2014, Tim finally convinced Christy that he NEEDED a tractor! This was no small feat, as the < 1/2 acre plot where they live could be mowed with a push mower (assuming Tim didn’t eat so many cheeseburgers).

Since both sets of grandparents were farmers (more on that in Christy’s write-up), they were intrigued by the tractor and our (lack of) need for it. Technology had moved ahead, so now we started posting videos on YouTube for them to watch since it was easier than creating and mailing DVDs. These early videos (Cultivating Corn with the 1025R, John Deere 1025R Hilling Potatoes and Corn with Disk Hillers) had no editing whatsoever. This is the footage shot from the camera, with nothing removed. We had learned from years of experience to “stop shooting when it gets boring” so that we didn’t need to edit (remember how I mentioned that editing was ‘painful’).

I’ll link those first videos here in case you haven’t been forced to watch them yet.



Anyway, shortly after posting these first videos, we noticed that they had 150+ views. “Hey, we don’t have THAT MUCH family! Who is watching these videos?” So, we uploaded another set of videos (John Deere 1025R Tree Moving)…again, no editing at all.
We saw the view counts increasing, and folks began to comment on our videos. We decided to monetize the channel, and it became a challenge to earn our first $1. We had a family party (over cheeseburgers of course) at 100,000 views. It just seemed like a fun challenge at first. Later, we noticed how rewarding it is to provide some wholesome (some folks say therapeutic) entertainment. Viewer comments have been our primary motivation through this whole process. Certainly more motivating than the $226 we earned from YouTube in that first year (2015).

Thanks very much for your positive feedback, and for becoming our friends. In some cases, almost family.

14 Comments

  1. Please keep posting these awesome videos. You and your family are an inspiration on many levels

  2. Hi Tim,

    Keep the videos coming. They are both entertaining and relaxing. Good examples of how life should be lived. Farm people and truckers are special.

    My son’s truck was hit by another truck at a truck plaza when he was with us – 20 miles away. The driver of that truck waited for us to get there. The damage looked to be just the bumper, grill, A/C compressor and some odd parts. Curtis left and headed to WV from OH to pick up his load on his RGN from an Army depot. All was well until he started to leave and the engine failed. He called his new buddy who was on his way to SC – take a nap, I’ll come and get you. He did, unhooked his trailed and tied onto Curtis’ load and they team drove to deliver it, returned to WV, picked up the CAT (Kenworth) and took it to the vet in Nashville – well that’s how the photo ccame in.

    Te expected $18K repair job has turned out to be $41K. About $10K not insured to get a “Gold CAT repair and warranty. He’s driving for his friend until his truck is repaired. Oh yes, his friend’s family farms 4,000 acres so farming is in his blood. Curtis is buying a little farm 111 acres. MHC Kenworth in Nashville, great people, are doing the work. What a community! Curtis’ friend was losing money trucking, then my daughter took over dispatching, for free, to teach him and in two weeks losses are turning to profits.

    And this is what I like about your videos. You teach probably more than you even realize. And I thank you for it.

    • Thanks very much for the kind words. We needed them today. We’re seeing summer doldrums in view counts, and we needed a pick-me-up!

  3. Awesome page!! Keep posting!! Because of you I got a 1025R & I love it!! I paid it forward too.. Watch the video of me & my co-workers cleaning up a yard for a retired Marine Corps Vet & it would not have been possible without my 1025R.
    Thank you sir!!

    https://www.facebook.com/OfficialECSO/videos/2105108102895477/

  4. These videos are addicting! I like how you show your family farm and what they do and also the videos of Johnny very impressive what all you can do. I’m second guessing buying my 3k riding cub and wish I had investigated the sub compact tractors.

    Keep posting you are an interesting and informative fellow. I couldn’t stop watching your 80+ yr old father drive that combine, you can tell it’s in his blood. Great memories that you have captured and shared with the world. Priceless.

    God Bless

    • Thanks very much for the kind words. Glad you are enjoying the videos.
      You are right about the memories. I knew we had a keeper from the combine that morning even before editing.

      A couple of weeks later, we attempted the same thing with soybeans (where I am driving …well not steering).
      Dad was exhausted that afternoon. So that video didn’t have quite as much ‘umph’, but it is still pretty good.

      I appreciate that you recognize some of the deeper aspects of the videos.

      Thanks again!

  5. Tim and family, Thanks so much for the ‘home videos’ on YT! Besides learning about tractor implements (I’m a retired computer guy who recently got a few acres and am trying to come up to speed on the ag stuff), I like the family-friendly aspect of what you’re doing … good job!
    God Bless,
    G. Kelly

  6. Hi Tim, I usually don’t care for videos on YouTube other than the ones that make you laugh. I bought a 1025r 2 years ago and can’t begin to describe my addiction to this machine. I recently came across you on YouTube and have become addicted just as I am to my 1025r. Your videos/explanations and descriptions have been so helpful, from regular maintenance tips to (and this is my favorite) the attachments. Because of you and your family it has inspired me to help my neighbors and community in ways that I never thought possible. I appreciate your family and videos in its entirety. Keep up the great work and God Bless

    • Thanks Doug!
      We try to keep it entertaining while providing some useful information.
      Buy some swag for your tractor from our sponsors :-). Heavy Hitch, Edge Tamers, Lube Shuttle, Artillian, etc. 🙂
      Thanks again!

  7. Richard Anderson in Washougal, WA

    Hi Tim, I’ve been watching your 1025r videos for months now – very informative and as others have mentioned, provides a view of a relaxing life style. I just saw the air filter bracket video and can relate. Mine broke a couple hundred hours ago and I just removed it and let the air filter hang by the hose. Not as conscientious on maintenance as I should be. ha, ha. Too busy putting hours on my 1025r at my farther in laws 30 acre hay farm.

    I was talked into not buying the auto connect feature for my mid mount 54″ mower deck and have regretted it ever since – sometimes have spent an hour getting the MMM back on the tractor after belt and bearing replacements and lube.

    I’ve been having an interesting time recently driving a friends 1998 JD 770 tractor that came with 5 attachments and a large trailer for $11,000. Super deal. Anyway, its a manual rig with only about 800 hours on it compared to my three year old 1025r with almost 600 hours already. The 770 is much more work to operate being a manual transmission, but it seems sturdier and more durable than my much newer 1025r. I get the impression the 770 was a precursor or inspiration to the newer 1025 series automatic rigs. I see much much more plastic and thinner metal parts on my newer 1025 – both rigs have the Yanmar (?) 25 hp diesel engines. I like the much larger size wheels on the 770 and it tows a drag blade very well when I work the long gravel driveway to remove pot holes at the farm.

    At any rate, I see a trade off over the years comparing the 770 to my newer 1025r – sturdy and tough giving way to lighter and less durable but much easier to operate.

    So…. When is JD Inc going to be sending me my new free $150 air filter and bracket assembly. { joke } ! know, but they would make points with JD owners for sure…

    Happy Tractor Times to ya,

    -Richard Anderson in Washougal WA
    Retired Camas, WA Paper Mill Industrial Electrician ( 43 years )

    • I would say that the 770 (a great Tractor btw) is not a direct comparison to the 1025r. Rather, I think the 2032r is a better comparison. Yes, the 2032r has more hp, but it is more similar in physical size and strength. In other words, one could say that the 770 was overbuilt for its hp rating.
      Just some thoughts.
      The 1025r seems to be quite well balanced. It is not as large and tough as the larger rigs, but it gets the job done. I’m pretty unforgiving to mine, and it is doing great!

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